ABOUT FEATURES PHOTOS,

MINI STORIES,

THREE ELEMENT SHOOTING

AND PROJECTS

See the Garage Band tutorial

Here's a feature photo from student Crystal Ochoa from the ASU-UofA Softball Game in the Republic.

Good example of a sports feature.

SOME EXAMPLES OF MINI STORY COVERAGE BY FORMER STUDENTS

See Erika Schultz' High School Rodeo coverage

(has more than three phots, but a perfect example of mini-story coverage)

http://www.schwepkerphoto.com/schultz2.html

A MINI STORY

1. ALL THREE PHOTOS ARE COMPELLING AND ARE STRONG ENOUGH TO STAND ON THEIR OWN.

THAT MEANS THAT IF YOU WERE NOT ABLE TO RUN ALL THREE PHOTOS,

EACH PHOTO WOULD BE STRONG ENOUGH TO BE PUBLISHED ALONE.

2. THERE IS A STRONG DOMINANT PHOTO

3. YOU GET THREE DIFFERENT PERSPECTIVES OF YOUR SUBJECT

THAT, PUT TOGETHER, TELLS A STORY.

4. YOU GET A MEANINGFUL CLOSEUP AND CONTEXT PHOTO.

YOUR EVENT SUBJECT CAN BE ANYTHING

AND DOES NOT HAVE TO BE A MAJOR EVENT.

5. YOUR PHOTOS ARE CANDID, NOT POSED. IT IS CANDID STROY TELLING.

YOU CAN MAKE GREAT PHOTOS FROM A BORING EVENT!!!!


SEE ERIKA SCHULTZ' WORK FROM NAU AND LONDON

See more serious feature photos here:

AMERICAN SOLDIER, photographed by Craig Walker

MM from American Soldier

See A Bridge to Nowhere

See They Call It Home

PLEASE READ THIS:

DETAIL SHOTS

A student in the PHO 284 class

brought up a good point and a key topic I need to address.

She felt that a certain "detail" shot could not be used because it could not stand on its own.

*

A photo story, mini story or project often need a "change of pace photo,"

 better known as a "visual break" photo.

 A "detail" shot is such a photo.

It may not have a face or person in it.

A "detail" shot seldom would

be a photo that is one that would "stand on its own,"

meaning, it will seldom be chosen as a

prime photo.

In media photography--be it multimedia or print--a "detail" shot is a "supporting" shot,

not a prime shot.

You may have noticed that Erika shoots a a fair number of detail photos,

as do most accomplished photojournalists.

The idea of a detail photo is not  to stand alone,

but rather to give a photo designer the ability to use it as a visual break.

When editing for photo stories, mini-stories or project work,

do not feel you have to exclude a "detail" shot because it can't stand on its own.

It is a VISUAL BREAK photo, essential especially in multimedia work.

 Peter

See the 2008 Homecoming Multimedia Show

See the Garage Band tutorial

PAST LINKS:

SEE THE LA TIMES EVENT COVERAGE OF RACE FOR A CURE

SEE 2008 PULITZER FINALIST LA TIMES NEWS COVERAGE OF FIRE

SEE ANOTHER LA TIMES FINALIST IN PULTIZER, 2009

PAST REVIEW LINKS:

PLEASE REVIEW "BIG THREE" THIS WEEK

SEE "COMMON GROUND" MULTIMEDIA

SEE THE 2008 WORK OF MICHAEL CHOW, ARIZONA REPUBLIC

• SEE THIS MULTIMEDIA WORK FROM THE DENVER POST AND PHOTOGRAPHER CRAIG WALKER:

Please observe how photographs offer different perspectives and lens usage. Note the clean

still photos. These are serious "feature" photos placed together into a project to tell the story with a single theme.

http://photos.denverpost.com/photoprojects/specialprojects/ianfisher/


SEE THESE LA TIMES MULTIMEDIA SHOWS ON THE LA COMMUNITY

BEACHES

STREETS

FEATURE PHOTOS

FOUND, CANDID UNPOSED HUMAN INTEREST PHOTOS

USED AS STAND-ALONE PHOTOS.

FEATURES ARE THE KEY TO MINI-STORIES,

IN DEPTH PHOTO STORIES AND PROJECT WORK

(see more at the very bottom of this page)

HERE'S SOME FEATURE WORK FROM ERIKA SCHULTZ, SEATTLE TIMES AND NAU GRAD:

SEE MORE FEATURES PHOTOS AT THIS BOTTOM OF THIS PAGE

  SEE THREE ELEMENT LINK HERE